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   Author  Topic: Toolcrypt's orabf  (Read 25072 times)
Marcel-Jan
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Toolcrypt's orabf
« on: Aug 29th, 2005, 12:17pm »
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Did you notice that the new version of Toolcrypt's orabf (http://www.toolcrypt.org/) now breaks passwords up to 15 characters, in stead of just 5 as was in the previous public release of orabf, version 0.32?
 
I'm trying to break a password of 8 letters right now and it happily goes beyond the 5 character mark. It is working on 7 letter combinations as we speak. My guess is that in about 3 and a half hours it will have checked all 1 to 7 letter combinations (on a PC with one 1.7 Ghz Pentium 4).
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Marcel-Jan
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Re: Toolcrypt's orabf
« Reply #1 on: Aug 30th, 2005, 10:26am »
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A nice new feature of orabf is the possibility to resume cracking of a password.  
 
orabf <passwordhash>:<username> <complexity> <max. characters>
For example:
orabf AG1232B114F4A25A:USERNAME 2 8
 
You can resume cracking this password with this command:
 
orabf AG1232B114F4A25A:USERNAME 2 8 resume
 
orabf has just cracked my 8 letter password here in 6 hours and 42 minutes. One sidenote here, my password started with an "A". orabf works through the list of passwords from A to Z, so a password "ZZZZZZZZ" would have taken considerably longer to crack.
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Re: Toolcrypt's orabf
« Reply #2 on: Aug 31st, 2005, 1:27am »
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I did a crack of a 6 character password in about half an hour (while I was using the PC for other stuff).
I was checking alphanumeric as well, and I noticed it included passwords starting with a number.
Not sure about 10G/10Gr2, but 9iR2 doesn't allow passwords starting with a numeric unless quoted.
 
Playing around with the resume file would probably allow you to start with A..... , and I guess if you had a couple of dozen PCs you could start one on each letter of the alphabet. [The resume file has 6 fields - the first I think is the number of combinations tried, the second is the username, the third is the last password checked, not sure on the fourth, the fifth is the complexity and the last is the max password length multiplied by two.]
 
I think it is safe to say that 8 character passwords can be practically cracked using brute force.  9 character would need some heavy resources.
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gamyers
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Re: Toolcrypt's orabf
« Reply #3 on: Sep 1st, 2005, 3:12am »
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Just a note regarding timings on  RDS:
 
 
The million passwords per sec for orabf is based on the Brute Force mode. Reading from a dictionary file slows it down to around 100,00 per second. [Specifically on my machine orabf went done from 990,000 on brute force to 115,000 per second on dictionary].  
 
checkpwd reads the dictionary file first (took 15 secs for about 1.5 million passwords on my machine). Once in memory it only took 5 seconds to go through the list (about 300,000 per sec).  
This method took slightly longer overall for an individual crack, but it would be a lot quicker if it was cracking a set of users over a database connection as it only reads the file once.
« Last Edit: Sep 17th, 2009, 5:24pm by Pete Finnigan » IP Logged
Pete Finnigan
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Re: Toolcrypt's orabf
« Reply #4 on: Sep 1st, 2005, 8:33pm »
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Hi everyone,
 
0rm has emailed me today to let me know that orabf has been updated to version 0.7.2 - this is available from [url http://www.toolcrypt.org/tools/orabf/index.html]http://www.toolcrypt.org/tools/orabf/index.html[/url]. He has fixed a small bug that prevented passwords that were a multiple of 4 from being cracked in brute force mode. In dictionary mode the problem did not exist. Download the updated version if you are using the cracker for real.
 
cheers
 
Pete
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Re: Toolcrypt's orabf
« Reply #5 on: Sep 16th, 2005, 2:13am »
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Just a note about the RESUME mode of this.
If orabf is stopped part way through, it creates a file with the suffix .res for resuming later.
The first part of this file name is the hashed password and the file contains the cleartext username. As such, the file itself is a potential security hole, so if you have been playing around with the tool its best to delete or secure any .res files that has been left.
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Pete Finnigan
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Re: Toolcrypt's orabf
« Reply #6 on: Sep 17th, 2005, 7:55pm »
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Good point Gary, but remember it is only a risk on Windows boxes as its a Windows binary, or rather Win32 binary. Good catch though.
 
cheers
 
Pete
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Re: Toolcrypt's orabf
« Reply #7 on: Sep 19th, 2005, 8:35am »
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Hi everybody,
 
Recently I did some tests with orabf on a Pentium 4 1,7 Ghz with 512Mb (memory is hardly a factor, orabf regularely uses about 700 Kb). I hacked alphabetical passwords with different lengths. Now orabf works through possible alphabetical passwords from A-Z, so to get the maximum time involved in cracking say a 5 character password, I chose 'ZZZZZ'. And here are the results:
 

UsernamePasswordPassword hashTime to crackNumber passw. tried
ZZ319B5E833E3291F700d 00:00:00default
YZ646A52B5505852EA00d 00:00:0027
ZZZ5A99821B918805AA00d 00:00:00703
ZZZZ748B146ADFA8EB5E00d 00:00:0018279
ZZZZZ05C69D5374090AF500d 00:00:01475255
ZZZZZZF29224D28E7B57EF00d 00:00:1612356631
ZZZZZZZ124F2EA043CD2ED100d 00:08:52321272407
ZZZZZZZZC717F96D746B329400d 03:16:558353082583
ZZZZZZZZZ7AAED8BB9D1B19F304d 09:12:38217180147159

 
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isaez
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Re: Toolcrypt's orabf
« Reply #8 on: Sep 20th, 2005, 1:25pm »
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Marcel-jan,
 
I don't understand the last column: "Number passw. tried"
From A to Z is 26 and from A to ZZ is 676 (s6^2) , etc.
How do you explain 27, 703, etc?
 
kind regards,
 
Ivan
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regards,

Ivan
Marcel-Jan
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Re: Toolcrypt's orabf
« Reply #9 on: Sep 21st, 2005, 10:46am »
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Ivan,
 
That has also boggled my mind. I've deduced that the formula to calculate orabf's letter combinations is:
 
combinations = combinationsn-1 * 26 + 1
where combinations0=27.
 
I wonder why that is. Perhaps it's a programming error.
 
Another thing for improvement is the way it approaches passwords with the full characterset. This set (which follows the ASCII table) is as follows:
 
NULL ! " # $ % & ' ( ) * + , -  . / 0-9 : ; < = > ? @ A-Z [ \ ] ^ _ ` { | } ~
 
orabf checks for passwords that start with the full characterset, while an Oracle password can only begin with a letter. So there is another possible speed improvement.
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Re: Toolcrypt's orabf
« Reply #10 on: Sep 21st, 2005, 10:57am »
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Marcel-jan,
 
Thank you for the explanation. It's a pity the makers of orabf didn't release the source of orabf. As you mention orabf waste time calculating hashes for passwords that are not allowed in Oracle.  
 
groetjes,
 
Ivan
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Ivan
Marcel-Jan
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Re: Toolcrypt's orabf
« Reply #11 on: Sep 21st, 2005, 11:39am »
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I see it as a possibility to make orabf perform even better. I've send a mail to toolcrypt.org with the suggestions.  
 
In the meantime I'm doing some performance tests on passwords with the full characterset (as far as possible in Oracle of course). Already it shows that using extra characters increases the time to crack a password dramatically. Cracking a 5 letter password takes 16 seconds, but with the full characterset it is probably going to take anything between 3/4 hour to a full hour. I'll keep you informed.
 
Another thing I should point out to anyone reading my performance test is that when 'ZZZZZ' as a password takes 16 seconds to crack and 'ZZZZZZ' takes about 9 minutes, cracking a 6-letter passwords takes of course anything BETWEEN 16 seconds and 9 minutes. I thought I should add that.
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isaez
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Re: Toolcrypt's orabf
« Reply #12 on: Sep 21st, 2005, 12:36pm »
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Marcel-jan,
 
If you use A-Z and 0-9 for your 8 characters long passwords you will have  2.901.713.047.668 password! (In reality of this number Oracle would accept 2.818.071.110.712 passwords as correct ones. Any password starting with a number would be refused)
If orabf computes 1.000.000 passwords/sec it will take
it 34 days to compute all 2.901.713.047.668 hashes.
 
It would be very nice if orabf would take into account any password policy defined in Oracle. A password policy could dramatically (?) reduce the universum from which passwords are chosen. Many use the standard password policy as defined by Oracle in utlpwdmg.sql:  
password should contain at least one character, one digit and one punctuation.
 
regards,
 
Ivan
 
p.s. I calculated 2.901.713.047.668 as:  
Omega (n 1 to Cool = 36^n
2.818.071.110.712 is the above without those passwords starting with a digit
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Ivan
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Re: Toolcrypt's orabf
« Reply #13 on: Sep 21st, 2005, 8:58pm »
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Hello Marcel-Jan and Isaez
 
The algorithm of orabf is correct.  
 
Oracle passwords can start with every character from the entire characterset. If your password start with a special character you must use a doublequote ".
 
SQL> alter user scott identified by 1alex;
alter user scott identified by 1alex
  *
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-00988: missing or invalid password(s)
 
 
SQL> alter user scott identified by "1alex";
 
User altered.
 
SQL> alter user scott identified by "!alex";
 
User altered.
 
SQL> alter user scott identified by "[alex";
 
User altered.
 
SQL> alter user scott identified by " alex";
 
User altered.
 
 
Regards
 
 Alexander
 
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« Last Edit: Sep 17th, 2009, 5:15pm by Pete Finnigan » IP Logged
isaez
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Re: Toolcrypt's orabf
« Reply #14 on: Sep 22nd, 2005, 9:45am »
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Kornbrust,
 
There are some characters that can't be used even inside quotes. Like &, @ . Those two characters are interpreted by sqlplus (at least & is). @ is interpreted as a remote connection.  
Also, not every dba/developer uses quotes in alter user to allow their users use punctuation characters.
 
By the way: people think that strong passwords are password that comply with rules like: at least 6 characters, at least one digit and at least one punctuation. Those rules are in reality in favor of brute force attacks! There is a paper from Lohkee that you can find through Google. Look for : Lohkee strong passwords zucchini
The web page doesn't exists anymore but you can read it from the cache.
 
regards,
 
Ivan
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regards,

Ivan
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